Call Me Songs

634-5789

Lyrics
If you need a little lovin’
Call on me all right
If you want a little huggin’
Call on me baby, mmmmmm
Oh I’ll be right here at home
All you got to do is
Pick up your telephone
And dial 634-5789
(What’s my number)
634-5789

Artist: Wilson Pickett
Movie: Blues Brothers 2000
Released: 1966
Genre: R&B/Soul

Songwriters: Steve Cropper / Eddie Floyd
634 5789 lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group

Also known as The “Wicked” Pickett
Born March 18, 1941
Prattville, Alabama, United States
Origin Detroit, Michigan, United States
Died January 19, 2006 (aged 64)
Reston, Virginia, United States
Genres R&B, soul, Southern soul
Occupation(s) Singer, songwriter
Instruments Vocals
Years active 1955–2006
Labels Atlantic, RCA, EMI,[1] Motown
Associated acts The Falcons

Pickett’s forceful, passionate style of singing was developed in the church and on the streets of Detroit,[3] under the influence of recording stars such as Little Richard, whom he referred to as “the architect of rock and roll.”[citation needed]

In 1955, Pickett joined the Violinaires[5], a gospel group. The Violinaires played with another gospel group on concert tour in America. After singing for four years in the popular gospel-harmony group, Pickett, lured by the success of gospel singers who had moved to the lucrative secular music market, joined the Falcons in 1959.[3]

Pickett’s personal life was troubled. In 1991, he was arrested for allegedly yelling death threats while driving a car over the front lawn of Donald Aronson, the mayor of Englewood, New Jersey. Pickett agreed to perform a benefit concert in exchange for having the charges dropped.[11] The following year, he was charged with assaulting his girlfriend[12].

In 1993, Pickett struck an 86-year-old pedestrian, Pepe Ruiz, with his car in Englewood.[11] Ruiz, who had helped organize the New York animation union, died later that year.[13] Pickett pleaded guilty to drunken driving charges and received a reduced sentence of one year in jail and five years probation.[14][15]

Throughout the 1990s, despite his personal troubles, Pickett was repeatedly honored for his contributions to music. In addition to being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991, his music was prominently featured in the film The Commitments, with Pickett as an off-screen character. In 1993, he was honored with a Pioneer Award by the Rhythm and Blues Foundation.

Pickett was a popular composer, writing songs that were recorded by many artists, including Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, the Rolling Stones, Aerosmith, the Grateful Dead, Booker T. & the MGs, Genesis, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Hootie & the Blowfish, Echo & the Bunnymen, Roxy Music, Bruce Springsteen, Los Lobos, the Jam and Ani DiFranco, among others.

Several years after his release from jail, Pickett returned to the studio and received a Grammy Award nomination for the 1999 album It’s Harder Now. The comeback resulted in his being honored as Soul/Blues Male Artist of the Year by the Blues Foundation in Memphis.[16] It’s Harder Now was voted ‘Comeback Blues Album of the Year’ and ‘Soul/Blues Album of the Year.’

He co-starred in the 2002 documentary Only the Strong Survive, directed by D. A. Pennebaker, a selection of both the 2002 Cannes and Sundance Film Festivals. In 2003, Pickett was a judge for the second annual Independent Music Awards to support independent artists’ careers.[17]

Pickett spent the twilight of his career playing dozens of concert dates every year until 2004, when he began suffering from health problems. While in the hospital, he returned to his spiritual roots and told his sister that he wanted to record a gospel album, but he never recovered.

Pickett was the father of six children.

In 2005, Wilson Pickett was voted into the Michigan Rock and Roll Legends Hall of Fame.[18]

On September 10, 2014, TVOne’s Unsung program aired a documentary that focused on Pickett’s life and career.[19]

Death
Pickett died of a heart attack on January 19, 2006, in Reston, Virginia. He was 64.[20] He was laid to rest in a mausoleum at Evergreen Cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky.[21] Pickett spent many years in Louisville. The eulogy was delivered by Pastor Steve Owens of Decatur, Georgia. Little Richard, a long-time friend of Pickett’s, spoke about him and preached a message at the funeral.[22] Pickett was remembered on March 20, 2006, at New York’s B.B. King Blues Club with performances by the Commitments, Ben E. King, his long-term backing band the Midnight Movers, soul singer Bruce “Big Daddy” Wayne, and Southside Johnny in front of an audience that included members of his family, including two brothers.

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